A matter of perspective

Last week I posted the following on my Facebook page:

“Do you remember when the thought of just staying home was so attractive? Having said that, it seems like years ago or that none of us had such a number of weeks and months in mind. Like you, I'm sure, some days are fine and others, well not so fine. I'm just thankful that I truly enjoy weeding. Oh yes, thankful that the drive-through at Tim Horton's remains open. Take care, stay safe and one of these days we'll just look back on it.”

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Musing over this week’s offering, I realize those words convey exactly what I thought about all week: how we handle life’s challenges includes a matter of perspective.

Here’s another “earthy” example. Looking out my kitchen or office windows, I have a beautiful view of the Pacific Ocean and across the water, of Vancouver Island. That’s always seemed relatively close by. Now, with ferry schedules cut back and all but essential travel discouraged, that same Island seems a very long way away. Perspective really does play into that one.

On a more “religious” tone, in reading through the Book of Acts, my human frustration has occasionally kicked in: “Why didn’t those folks know that the Gentiles have as much access to salvation as the Jews?” Well that’s another supreme example of perspective: we’re looking back, they were looking forward to the formation of the church.

Even closer to home for me, however, are the predictions found in some passages of Scripture. World famine, world wars, or huge hunks of the population wiped out - all seemed rather far-fetched (at least in my part of the world). Suddenly, with Covid-19, those possibilities are far too possible/probable.

Most vital today, however: How do we see Jesus? Is He truly the Lord of our lives?

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